Drum Corps International

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Drum Corps International (DCI) is a non-profit organization serving drum corps around the world. Drum corps that compete and participate in Drum Corps International are split into DCI Division I, DCI Division II, and DCI Division III.

Drum Corps International (DCI) is a nonprofit youth organization serving junior drum and bugle corps around the globe. From modest beginnings in 1972, DCI has developed into a powerful youth activity with artistic and organizational influence on the world's drum and bugle corps, marching bands, and related activities. Regional, focus, sponsored, and sanctioned shows have brought the drum corps experience to several million more in hundreds of towns and cities throughout North America.

In 2006, DCI corps will again travel throughout North America, starting in early June and culminating in August at the World Championships in Madison, Wis., from Aug. 8-12, 2006.

Past Champions - Who are they? It started with the Kingsmen in 1972. And it stretches in an unbroken chain from then until this day. Every summer, the top corps in the country gather in one place to vie for the title of DCI World Champions. In our Hall of Fame, we are pleased to salute the latest winner and honor all those who have come before. To be listed here is no small achievement. The following corps names reflect the efforts of many individuals. Who have worked hard. Struggled long. And achieved much.

Membership in a drum and bugle corps means many things. Sure, it means you get to travel and perform, learn music, and make new friends. But membership also means taking responsibility for yourself and others around you. It means self-discipline, teamwork, and sharing. It means hard work, mental and physical health, and learning about yourself -- about your character. Membership comes with a lifetime of memories.

History

Created in 1972 from the combination of the Midwest Combine and United Organization of Junior Corps as a reaction of the strict rules and guidelines of the VFW and AL.

The 13 charter members of the organization were: Anaheim Kingsmen, Argonne Rebels, Blessed Sacrament Golden Knights, Blue Rock, Blue Stars, Boston Crusaders, Cavaliers, De La Salle Oaklands, Garfield Cadets, Madison Scouts, Santa Clara Vanguard, Troopers and 27th Lancers.

Tour

The full Drum Corps International summer tour lasts seven weeks and culminates with one week of Championships. DCI Division I corps will generally tour this full amount of time, covering more than 10,000 miles. Division II and III corps generally tour only on weekends during this time, with a one or two week tour preceeding Championships.

Finals, the last event at Championships is usually broadcast live to air. To find out when, visit DCI Telecast Airing.

Adjudication

One of Drum Corps International's goals was to standardize rules and adjudication procedures for the Junior Drum Corps activity. Prior to DCI's existence, corps tailored their shows towards the rules specifications of either American Legion or Veterans of Foreign Wars.

Currently, drum corps are judged by eight or nine adjudicators. The technique used to assign scores by these adjudicators is based on a "buil-up" system. This means that corps are awarded for things they do well rather than penalized for errors.

The highest score possible is 100. This score is broken down into three categories: General Effect, worth 40 points; Visual, worth 30 points; and Music, worth 30 points. These three categories are further broken down into subcategories.

Adjudication breakdown and definition

Championships

Past DCI Champions

Future DCI Championship Locations

Individual & Ensemble

DCI sponsored, during the week of Finals, an event called Individual & Ensemble. These were events in which individual members, or small ensembles, would showcase themselves in their respective instrumentation. These events were also judged. This varied on the type of event.

Rehearsal time for these event were done on the performers own time when their corps was not rehearsing, which was usually at lunch, dinner, after rehearsal, after a corps performance or on days off.

See Also

Related Organizations

External Links